During the visit

White Tower

The White Tower

It’s the central building of the Tower of London, its dungeon. It was the first built in 1078 by William the Conqueror in order to control both the Thames and the city of London.

Royal Chapel

The Royal Chapel

The St Peter Ad Vincula Royal Chapel was built around 1100 but the building burnt in 1512, so the current church dates from 1519.

Waterloo Barracks

The Waterloo Barracks

The barracks, built in 1845, is the biggest building of the Tower. Originally, it could host a garrison of more than 800 soldiers but since 1967, it is the home of The Crown Jewels.

Ceremony of the Keys

The Ceremony of the Keys

Every evening, Yeomen Warders (or Beefeaters), famous guards of the Tower in their black and red suits, take part in the same ceremony : the chief of the guards armed with the queen’s keys and a lantern followed by his escort is heading to the Fortress’s door.

Crown Jewels

The Crown Jewels

The name “Crown Jewels” designates the set of clothes and ornaments weared by the english sovereign during his coronation ceremony. It’s composed of : crown, sword, scepter, globes… along with a ceremonial robe.

Constable Tower

The Constable Tower

The Constable Tower is, like the Devereux Tower, one of the towers of the first fortification of the London Tower. This tower takes its name from the "constables" who are the commanders and the persons in charge of the place (in this case the Constable Tower).

Salt Tower

The Salt Tower

The Tower was built in 1230 during the reign of Henry III. Its name comes from the salt (very precious at the time) that was stored in the tower.

The Tower hosted several famous prisoners such as the King of Scotland John Balliol from 1299 until his death in 1313, or even Giovanni Battista Castiglione an Italian who came to carry letters to Princess Elizabeth.

Bowyer Tower

The Bowyer Tower

The Bowyer Tower was built during the reign of King Henry III between 1238 and 1241. It’s located to the north of the Tower of London and is D-shaped. The bedroom on the ground floor is the original piece of this tower because it is the only one that survived following the fire on the night of October 30, 1841 that destroyed the top of the tower.

Brick Tower

The Brick Tower

The Brick Tower is on the north side of the Tower of London. It is made of squared stones. Like the Bowyer Tower, this tower is D-shaped. On the fortress side, the wall is flat while the outer side is circular: a shape that favors the position of the archers.

Cradle Tower

The Cradle Tower

The Cradle Tower was built by Edward III. It is on the South side, along the bank, on the outer wall of the Tower of London. It was used to join the King's quarters in the Lanthorn Tower.

Martin Tower

The Martin Tower

The Martin Tower is on the North side, on the first fortification of the Tower of London. It is precisely at the Northeast corner. The Martin Tower is a group of buildings nested within each other.

Devereux Tower

The Devereux Tower

The Devereux Tower is one of the towers of the first fortification of the London Tower. It is opposite to the Martin Tower, that is to the north-west side.

Lanthorn Tower

The Lanthorn Tower

Built between 1238 and 1272, it was commissioned by Henry III. It is one of many towers that were built at that time, towers serving as a defense for the white tower that was given a rampart.

Traitor's Gate

The Traitor's Gate

The Traitor's Gate is the second entrance to the Tower of London, the one no one wanted to cross. It is a maritime entrance, so it can only be used by boat. It was built between 1275 and 1279.

Beauchamp tower

The Beauchamp Tower

The Beauchamp tower is part of the defensive interior wall, it was built between 1275 and 1281 by King Edward I, namely close to the end of the first modernization of the Tower of London.

Flint Tower

The Flint Tower

The Flint Tower is the second tower of defense on the first fortification of the Tower of London. It is next to Devereux Tower, which is the corner, and it is oriented North side. It is relatively low, it’s a cylindrical tower about 8m in diameter, with loopholes on the lower part and rectangular windows on the upper part.

Headquarters of the Royal Regiment of Fusiliers

The Headquarters of the Royal Regiment of Fusiliers with Regimental Museum

The Headquarters of the Royal Regiment of Fusiliers is one of the buildings still military in the London Tower. It is however visitable and has a museum that makes it mainly tourist. The building itself is in a neo-medieval style identical to the Waterloo Barracks.

Wakefield Tower

The Wakefield Tower

Originally called Blundeville Tower, the Wakefield Tower was built from 1220 during the first wave of modifications to the Tower of London. It was at this time that King Henry III built the wall that is now inside the complex, and along which was built a series of defensive towers or dwelling.

Bloody Tower

The Bloody Tower

The Bloody Tower is one of the constructions begun under Henry III between 1238 and 1272, during the first wave of modifications of the Tower of London. It took the nickname of bloody tower following the murder of the two princes Edward V and his young brother Richard, Duke of York.

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The Legge's Mount

The Legge’s Mount is part of the second belt of the Tower of London, the one overlooking the outside. It was intended to strengthen the defenses of the fortress by adding firepower with cannons.

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The Brass Mount

The Brass Mount is located at the northeast corner of this fortress, it’s an artillery tower. It was intended to strengthen the defenses of the fortress by adding firepower by cannon. Mount Brass is part of the second belt of the Tower of London, the one overlooking the outside.